Waianae Coast featured in February National Geographic

Excerpt from “Hawaiian Renaissance” article by John Lancaster in the February 2015 National Geographic:

The communities collectively known as the West Side are situated along Oahu’s Farrington Highway, which begins west of Pearl Harbor and passes through Makaha before terminating near the island’s northwestern tip, called Kaena Point. Running along the base of the Waianae Range, it’s a rain-starved coastal strip that’s one of the oldest settled parts of Oahu. Here and there are ruins of stone temples and fishponds, along with more contemporary echoes of Hawaii’s past: roadside stands selling poke (raw fish) and laulaus (pork wrapped in taro leaves), outrigger canoes hauled up on the beach at Pokai Bay. But for the most part this is not the Hawaii of tourist brochures. In the main town of Waianae the highway is lined with fast-food outlets, pawnshops, and scruffy shopping plazas…”

Photograph by Paul Nicklen Best friends Ha‘a Keaulana, at right, and Maili Makana dive under a wave on their way to a surfing spot near their hometown of Makaha. Like generations before them, they visit these waters almost every day to refresh both body and spirit.

Photograph by Paul Nicklen
Best friends Ha‘a Keaulana, at right, and Maili Makana dive under a wave on their way to a surfing spot near their hometown of Makaha. Like generations before them, they visit these waters almost every day to refresh both body and spirit.

Photograph by Paul Nicklen In his workshop at home in Makaha, retired bus driver Bruce DeSoto sculpts a foam board by hand. “My shaping is pretty old style,” he says. “Nowadays there are computers that shape the boards. They pop them out in factories.”

Photograph by Paul Nicklen
In his workshop at home in Makaha, retired bus driver Bruce DeSoto sculpts a foam board by hand. “My shaping is pretty old style,” he says. “Nowadays there are computers that shape the boards. They pop them out in factories.”

To read the full article by John Lancaster and to see more photographs from Paul Nicklen, click here for the full story.

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