Waste-to-Energy Power Plant Initiative Led by Maili Resident

Ma'ili resident Kekoa McClellan and Senator Shimabukuro
Ma’ili resident Kekoa McClellan and Senator Shimabukuro

Senator Shimabukuro recently met with Kekoa McClellan of Ma’ili to learn more about Pelatron Q and its waste-to-energy power plant initiative.

Legislation has been introduced on behalf of Pelatron Q. Senate Bill 1047 authorizes the issuance of special purpose revenue bonds to Pelatron Q for the development of waste-to-energy power plants in Hawaii.

Pelatron Q’s power plants will use a patented plasma gasification and vitrification process to convert all types of waste, including municipal solid waste, construction and demolition waste, green waste, medical waste, industrial waste, or any carbonaceous matter, into clean renewable energy that can be exported to the grid.

The development of these waste-to-energy power plants will contribute to the State’s energy security, reduce the State’s carbon footprint, reduce the environmental impact of landfilling waste, and add living-wage jobs to the State’s economy.

For more information on SB1047, click here for bill status.

Pelatron Q is a joint venture of Pelatron Power Evolution and Solena Q. Leading the development activities for our partnership is Kekoa McClellan, President and CEO of Pelatron Power Evolution. A community first firm, Pelatron Power Evolution, a member to the Pelatron Q joint venture, is owned in part by the Pelatron Center for Economic Development (PCED). PCED actively supports the economic welfare of Native Hawaiians through public and private educational, community and business partnerships. As a Hawaiian company, the values of aloha ‘aina and ‘ike pono drive our every decision. The opportunity to deliver a market solution to our community’s waste issues that provided a clean energy solution was a natural fit.

More information can be found on the company website: www.pelatron-q.com.

Waianae Coast featured in February National Geographic

Excerpt from “Hawaiian Renaissance” article by John Lancaster in the February 2015 National Geographic:

The communities collectively known as the West Side are situated along Oahu’s Farrington Highway, which begins west of Pearl Harbor and passes through Makaha before terminating near the island’s northwestern tip, called Kaena Point. Running along the base of the Waianae Range, it’s a rain-starved coastal strip that’s one of the oldest settled parts of Oahu. Here and there are ruins of stone temples and fishponds, along with more contemporary echoes of Hawaii’s past: roadside stands selling poke (raw fish) and laulaus (pork wrapped in taro leaves), outrigger canoes hauled up on the beach at Pokai Bay. But for the most part this is not the Hawaii of tourist brochures. In the main town of Waianae the highway is lined with fast-food outlets, pawnshops, and scruffy shopping plazas…”

Photograph by Paul Nicklen Best friends Ha‘a Keaulana, at right, and Maili Makana dive under a wave on their way to a surfing spot near their hometown of Makaha. Like generations before them, they visit these waters almost every day to refresh both body and spirit.

Photograph by Paul Nicklen
Best friends Ha‘a Keaulana, at right, and Maili Makana dive under a wave on their way to a surfing spot near their hometown of Makaha. Like generations before them, they visit these waters almost every day to refresh both body and spirit.

Photograph by Paul Nicklen In his workshop at home in Makaha, retired bus driver Bruce DeSoto sculpts a foam board by hand. “My shaping is pretty old style,” he says. “Nowadays there are computers that shape the boards. They pop them out in factories.”

Photograph by Paul Nicklen
In his workshop at home in Makaha, retired bus driver Bruce DeSoto sculpts a foam board by hand. “My shaping is pretty old style,” he says. “Nowadays there are computers that shape the boards. They pop them out in factories.”

To read the full article by John Lancaster and to see more photographs from Paul Nicklen, click here for the full story.

Waianae Public Library February Book Club: February 18

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Waianae Public Library Valentine Party: February 13

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PSI Basic Seminar: February 25, 2015

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Native Hawaiian Roll Commission Status Update

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Click image to open PDF