Manawale’a Project: Hawaii’s Community Service Resource; Co-Founded by Kawika Ayau of Makaha

Kawika Ayau, 5th from right, is the Fundraising Chair for the E Ala Voyaging Canoe Education Program, and a member of the Hoa Aina o Makaha farm board.  Ayau, a Makaha resident, is co-founder of the Manawale'a Project, which specializes in organizing corporate community service projects and fundraisers.

Kawika Ayau, 5th from right, is the Fundraising Chair for the E Ala Voyaging Canoe Education Program, and a member of the Hoa Aina o Makaha farm board. Ayau, a Makaha resident, is co-founder of the Manawale’a Project, which specializes in organizing corporate community service projects and fundraisers.

Kawika Ayau

Kawika Ayau

Information about the Manawale’a Project from Kawika Ayau: Many companies have their associates participate in community service projects, however, normally the individual organizing these has other primary job duties. Manawale’a Project provides logistical coordination and management for companies who want to make a bigger impact but do not have the resources. We are not a nonprofit and sustain ourselves through a fair coordination fee based on the individual project.

We also provide services to local charitable organizations in terms of maximizing the potential revenue for their fundraisers. We are able to customize these fundraisers based on budget, goal(s), needs of the organization and their participant demographic. We offer complete logistical and event management for a variety of fundraisers including, but not limited to: golf and other sports related tournaments, galas and themed parties, food and wine events, concerts and anything else under the sun. Manawale’a Project also charges a small coordination fee to these organizations.

For more information, visit: http://www.manawaleaproject.com

PALS Presents Hip Hop Genius 3/5/14 – RSVP by 2/26

Aloha PALS Partners,

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Click image to enlarge.

We are excited to present Sam Seidel of Hiphopgenius.org. He used hip hop and rap music to teach in a juvenile prison. Students became engaged. Come and learn about project based learning and creativity in learning. He will be flying to Hawaii to talk with us on Wednesday, March 6. Please see flyer below for more information. We look forward to seeing you.

Mahalo,
PALS Team

Tina Lopez
PALS Program Coordinator
Office of Student Equity, Excellence & Diversity (SEED)
University of Hawai’i at Manoa
2600 Campus Rd, QLSSC 413 Honolulu, HI 96822
(808) 226-7749
(808) 956-9240 (fax)
http://www.palshi.org/

Ahi Fever 2014 Jun 14-15: Sponsors & Advertisers Needed

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Fundraiser for Punana Leo o Wai’anae 3/29/14, 7am-2p

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Wai’anae Coast Scholar Speaker Series 2/25/14 at 5:30pm

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World Longboard Champion Duane Desoto Founds Na Kama Kai to Nurture Love for the Ocean Among Youth

Na Kama Kai

Nā Kama Kai Ocean Clinics service our community statewide through touching the lives of our youth in numerous capacities. Our statewide ocean clinics nurture a deep sense of love for the ocean among youth. The experience ingrains in each of the participants an understanding of their kuleana to water safety and environmental awareness. Our clinics offer group and one-on-one interactions with professional surfers, watermen and waterwomen, lifeguards, firefighters, marine scientists, Hawaiian cultural practitioners, and ocean rescue instructors.

The clinics provide a positive, nurturing, and controlled environment enabling keiki to become confident in the ocean through a personally guided experience. Participants learn Hawaiian stories related to the event location, help shape traditional wooden boards, and learn about traditional Hawaiian ocean culture through the contemporary perspective of ocean professionals. Nā Kama Kai programs target all youth from 2 to 18 years of age in many different cultural settings. Currently most of the programs occur on the Island of O’ahu, and to a lesser extent on the other neighbor islands of Hawai’i. Also, ocean clinics have been held at Papeete, Tahiti, and Dana Point CA, and have demonstrated that the programs provided by Nā Kama Kai can serve as a model for other coastal communities anywhere in the world, provided they incorporate place based cultural values and traditional knowledge.

Clinics are periodically held at Poka`i Bay. Volunteers sought. For more information, visit: http://nakamakai.org/

Duane DeSoto

Duane DeSoto

Duane DeSoto, founder & CEO of Na Kama Kai, was born and raised on the west side of O`ahu. He has traveled around the world for the last 17 years competing in contests. His love for the ocean and appreciation of the waterman lifestyle is what drives him. His dream of giving back to his community came to fruition with the establishment of Nā Kama Kai. Duaneʻs passion for the ocean continues to sustain his lifestyle and allows him to engage in community building through Nā Kama Kaiʻs programs; using the ocean to empower our youth.

Biography of Duane DeSoto: http://www.worldchampionsofsurfing.com/duane-desoto-biography/

HART Traffic Advisory 2/21/14

Click image to see the entire advisory.

Click image to see the entire advisory.

DOE Working Group to Review Pono Choices 2/27: Email Your Testimony by 2/26 Noon

(Source: DOE new release, 2/21/14)

The Hawaii State Department of Education (DOE) yesterday convened a working group to review Pono Choices, a sexual health education curriculum taught in some middle schools as part of a research study by the University of Hawaii’s (UH) Center on Disability Studies.

On Feb. 4, at a regularly scheduled meeting of the Hawaii State Board of Education (BOE), a discussion of sexual health education curriculum drew additional comments regarding Pono Choices. The BOE received more than 100 written testimonies expressing concerns over the UH pilot curriculum. As a result, the DOE convened a working group comprised of diverse stakeholders to review Pono Choices and make a recommendation on whether it meets statutory requirements and applicable BOE policies regarding sexual health education curriculum.

The group, chaired by DOE Deputy Superintendent Ronn Nozoe, includes:

  • Darrin Araki, executive director, Hawaii Pastors Roundtable
  • Dr. Robert Bidwell, associate clinical professor of pediatrics and director of adolescent medicine, John A. Burns School of Medicine, UH Manoa
  • Karen Ginoza, representative of He’e Coalition and Faith Action for Community Equity (FACE)
  • Kimberly Kepner-Sybounmy, parent representative
  • Noella Kong, state adolescent health coordinator, Hawaii State Department of Health
  • Justin Mew, principal of Kaiser High School; former principal of Niu Valley Middle School and former science teacher
  • Donna Rodenhurst, health teacher, King Intermediate School
  • Kumu Hina Wong-Kalu, director of culture, Halau Lokahi Public Charter School

The working group meets again on Feb. 27 and welcomes public input through noon on Feb. 26 via email at hipublicschools@gmail.com. All feedback will be logged and shared with group members. Individuals should not resubmit testimony already provided to the BOE.

The working group will spend as much time as necessary to conduct a thorough review of Pono Choices prior to issuing a public report.

In November, the DOE temporarily placed Pono Choices on hold to address concerns about whether the curriculum was aligned with health education state law and policy. A subsequent UH review of its copyrighted curriculum concluded Pono Choices met the standards.

Soil Health and Food Security Panel at Nanakuli HS a Big Success

Soil Health and Food Security Panel flyer. Click image to enlarge.

Soil Health and Food Security Panel flyer. Click image to enlarge.

From: Kellen Smith
Date: January 29, 2014 at 6:42:24 PM HST
Subject: Soil Health and Food Security Panel

Aloha!

Our island’s current food security and soil health are hot topics lately. You are invited to attend a panel discussion regarding these concerning issues at Nanakuli High School on February 4th from 9:15-11:45am in the school library. Please see attached flyer, and we hope you can attend!

Malama Pono,
Kellen Smith
UH-PALS Coordinator
Student Equity, Excellence & Diversity
University of Hawai`i at Manoa
Queen Lili`uokalani Center for Student Services 413
2600 Campus Road
Honolulu, Hawai`i 96822

Attendees at the 2/4/14 event enjoyed a lively panel discussion about restoring the health and fertility of our island's soil, and natural farming.  L-R: Jonathan Deenik, UH soil scientist; Michael Duponte, UH extension agent; Joe McGinn, certified Korean natural farmer; North Shore Farmer's Market representative; Keoni Ford, chair of the board at Hoa 'Aina o Makaha; Lloyd Nelson, Biodynamic Association and former head farmer of Kahumana Farm.

Attendees at the 2/4/14 event enjoyed a lively panel discussion about restoring the health and fertility of our island’s soil, and natural farming. L-R: Jonathan Deenik, UH soil scientist; Michael Duponte, UH extension agent; Joe McGinn, certified Korean natural farmer; North Shore Farmer’s Market representative; Keoni Ford, chair of the board at Hoa ‘Aina o Makaha; Lloyd Nelson, Biodynamic Association and former head farmer of Kahumana Farm.

Kellen Smith, UH-PALS Coordinator, helped organize the event and also served as one of the presenters.

Kellen Smith, UH-PALS Coordinator, helped organize the event and also served as one of the presenters.

Queen Liliuokalani Statue Debate

Nanakuli resident Aulani Ahmad testified in support of a measure to switch the locations of the Queen Liliuokalani statue and the Eternal Flame war memorial.  The bill was suggested by Momi Cazimero, and eventually failed due to a lack of consensus.  However, the debate is likely to continue into the future.  Here is a link to SB2505: http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/measure_indiv.aspx?billtype=SB&billnumber=2505

Nanakuli resident Aulani Ahmad testified in support of a measure to switch the locations of the Queen Liliuokalani statue and the Eternal Flame war memorial. The bill was suggested by Momi Cazimero, and eventually failed due to a lack of consensus. However, the debate is likely to continue into the future. Link to SB2505.

Keone Kali of Makaha Named Deputy CIO at Office of Information Management and Technology

Sen. Shimabukuro recently met with Makaha resident  Keone Kali, who Governor Abercrombie named as Deputy CIO – Operations in the Office of Information Management and Technology.

Sen. Shimabukuro recently met with Makaha resident
Keone Kali, who Governor Abercrombie named as Deputy CIO – Operations in the Office of Information Management and Technology.

[Source: Press Release from Office of Information Management & Technology, State of Hawaii, 11/16/12]

DEPUTY CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICERS NAMED TO ADVANCE STATE’S IT TRANSFORMATION

HONOLULU (November 15, 2012) – Governor Abercrombie today announced the appointment of Randy Baldemor as Deputy Chief Information Officer (CIO) – Business Transformation and Keone Kali as Deputy CIO – Operations in the Office of Information Management and Technology. The deputies will support State of Hawaii CIO Sanjeev “Sonny” Bhagowalia in implementing the state’s Business and Information Technology/Information Resource Management Transformation Plan, which was released in October 2012.

“Randy and Keone are both committed to improving the way government serves the people of Hawaii through the use of technology,” said Governor Abercrombie. “The depth and breadth of their experience in implementing best practices in technology and business policies, processes, and standards will help move my administration’s IT transformation initiative forward for the benefit of the entire state.”

As Deputy CIO – Business Transformation, Baldemor will be responsible for managing the major business transformation programs and initiatives that will bridge the gap between the current and future business environment. This includes driving inter-agency collaboration and organizational change management, developing objectives and standards, and streamlining business processes. Baldemor brings to his new position 12 years of diverse business experience, most recently as deputy director of the state Department of Taxation. He has also served as president of software development company DiscoveryBox, assistant vice-president of claims for Island Insurance Companies, and litigation partner at Goodsill Anderson Quinn & Stifel LLP. Baldemor received his undergraduate degree in political science from the University of Florida and earned his law degree from the University of Washington School of Law.

Kali will manage all aspects of IT operations, including enterprise shared services, infrastructure and security and privacy, as well as strategically driving operations to leverage technology resources, systems and solutions more efficiently and effectively. Kali brings 18 years of experience in information technology, business development, and management in both the public and private sector. He most recently served as the director of information technology and acting chief technology officer for the Pacific Disaster Center on Maui. Kali was also the CIO for the City of Beverly Hills, where he designed, executed and managed a comprehensive 5-year Information Technology Master Plan, transformed the city’s technology architecture to support highly-available and accessible public services, and formed new revenue generating programs. He is a graduate of the University of California, Los Angeles.

Sludge Upate: 2014 Bills (2/19/14)

Sen. Maile Shimabukuro

Sen. Maile Shimabukuro

Sen. Shimabukuro recently sent the email below to Waianae Neighborhood Board Chair Johnnie-Mae Perry:

Dear Johnnie-Mae:

Mahalo for your email inquiring about the status of the sludge-related measures you asked me to support.  I am happy to report the following:

Environmental Court

SB 632 is moving through the Senate.  It establishes environmental courts as divisions within the circuit courts to hear all proceedings, including certain chapter 91, Hawaii Revised Statutes, proceedings arising from certain environmental laws. Requires the Judiciary to report to the Legislature on the total number of environmental-related cases filed in the last five years. Takes effect 1/1/2015. (SD1).  Here is a link to SB632: http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/measure_indiv.aspx?billtype=SB&billnumber=632

Funding for Environmental Justice on the Waianae Coast

As you requested, I introduced SB3011 (Environmental Justice/Waianae Valley/Appropriation).  Unfortunately, the bill was not scheduled for a hearing because it only applied to one specific area in the state. It would have been subject to questioning as to why other areas would not be entitled to such an appropriation.  Here is a link to the bill: http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/measure_indiv.aspx?billtype=SB&billnumber=3011&year=2014

However, the good news is that SB 2196 increases funding for environmental disasters, like the Matson spill and the sludge dumping.  More specifically, the bill:

  • re-establishes the energy systems development special fund, which was repealed on June 30, 2013;
  • increases the amount of the environmental response, energy, and food security tax to be deposited into the environmental response revolving fund, energy security special fund, and agricultural development and food security special fund;
  • extends the repeal of various allocations of the environmental response, energy, and food security tax from June 30, 2015, to June 30, 2030. (SD1)

Here is a link to SB2196, which is moving through the Senate: http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/measure_indiv.aspx?billtype=SB&billnumber=2196

Mahalo nui loa for the continued work on the sludge issue and your commitment to improving conditions on the Waianae Coast.

Aloha ,
Senator Maile Shimabukuro
District 21 (Kalaeloa, Honokai Hale, Ko Olina, Nanakuli, Ma`ili, Wai`anae, Makaha, Makua)
State Capitol, Room 222
415 South Beretania Street
Honolulu, HI 96813
808-586-7793 phone
808-586-7797 facsimile
maileshimabukuro@yahoo.com
Facebook: Like Me
Twitter: @SenMaile
Blog: http://21maile.com

BOE Sets Firm Support of Hawaiian Education (2/18/14)

DOE-HLIP

The Hawaii State Board of Education (BOE) and the Department of Education (DOE) today reaffirmed their commitment to Hawaiian Education and Hawaiian Immersion programs in Hawaii’s public schools.

The BOE approved key policy changes affirming that Hawaiian language, culture and history should be an integral part of Hawaii’s educational standards for all students in grades K-12.

Hawaiian Education policy 2104 states, “Hawaii’s public education system should embody Hawaiian values, language, culture and history as a foundation to prepare student in grades K-12 for success in college, career and communities, locally and globally.”

BOE Chairperson Don Horner stated, “The policy strengthens our commitment to offer students the added value of a bilingual, bicultural based education. The curricula will have rigorous performance standards and be taught by a core of qualified, effective teachers. The goal is to graduate outstanding students that are highly proficient in both English and Hawaiian and are well prepared for college, career and contributors to community.”

The Board spent nearly one year working with stakeholders to craft policy revisions.

“It was very important that stakeholders be an integral part of this process and the policies reflect the shared goals of the DOE and the community,” explained BOE Student Achievement Committee Chairwoman Cheryl Kauhane Lupenui. “We held more than 40 stakeholder meetings during the development process and at today’s meeting we received over 100 testimony in support of the policies.”

Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi stated, “The department looks forward to advancing Hawaiian education as an integral part of our public schools for all students.”

The state currently has 20 Hawaiian Immersion programs, including six at charter schools. The proposed amendments to BOE policy 2104 and 2105 can be viewed on the BOE’s General Business Meeting on the BOE site.

Makua Valley Public Cultural Access 2/22/14 – Call to Reserve Spot by Feb 19

Image captured at ahupua'a of Mākua by the one and only Clark Little. Find his images on Facebook at Clark Little Photography.

From the album Timeline Photos by Mālama Mākua. Image captured at ahupua’a of Mākua by the one and only Clark Little. Find his images on Facebook at Clark Little Photography. Click to enlarge.

Aloha kākou! Please join Mālama Mākua on the next public cultural access into sacred Mākua Valley this Saturday, Feb. 22, beginning at 7 a.m. The plan right now, after ho’okupu is presented at Ahu Mākua, is to make the hike up into the back of ahupua’a Kahanahāiki. If you haven’t been, please join us in visiting these special and historical sites. If you have already been, please join us again. Call Fred Dodge at 696-4677 or Vince Kana’i Dodge at 478-6492 to reserve your spot on the list no later than Wednesday afternoon.

Volunteers Sought: Hawaii Hazards Awareness & Resilience Program (HHARP)

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Hearing Scheduled: HB2509 HD1 re MAKING AN APPROPRIATION TO ASSIST COMMUNITIES WITH THE REMOVAL OF MOTOR VEHICLE TIRES 2/20/14 at 1:30pm

Aloha!

HB2509 HD1 (see information below) has been scheduled for a hearing in front of the House Finance (FIN) Committee at 130p THU FEB 20 in Conference Room 308 at the Hawaii State Capitol.

HB2509 HD1 appropriates funds to assist communities affected by discarded or abandoned tires by providing funds for programs promoting the removal of abandoned tires that have been illegally dumped from the landscape, including funding county abandoned tire removal programs.

Testimony can be submitted online via the Capitol website at this link:

http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/measure_indiv.aspx?billtype=HB&billnumber=2509

OR, you can email the committee clerk at FINTestimony@capitol.hawaii.gov

Here is a link to the hearing notice:
http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/session2014/hearingnotices/HEARING_FIN_02-20-14_3_.HTM

The Beat: ‘Should Hawaii Re-Designate Discoverers’ Day As Indigenous Peoples’ Day?’

By Chad Blair
Honolulu Civil Beat, 2/7/14

That’s what Senate Bill 317 calls for. It has a hearing this afternoon.

The bill, introduced by Sen. Maile Shimabukuro, explains that the re-designation the second Monday of October from “Discoverers’ Day” to “Indigenous Peoples’ Day” would be recognition of Polynesian discoverers of the Hawaiian Islands and accomplishments of the indigenous voyagers who founded and settled “the myriad islands” of the Pacific Ocean more than 1,000 years before Columbus was born.

SB 317 would also recognize “countless indigenous peoples who perished as a result of confrontations” between indigenous peoples and Europeans.

Star-Advertiser: ‘Slayer of Peacock Decided Not to Sue Condo Association’

Star-Advertiser 2/13/14

Question: Whatever happened to the lawsuit that was supposed to be filed in the aftermath of cruelty-to-animals charges against the woman who killed a peacock with a baseball bat in 2009?

Answer: In January 2011, Sandra Maloney, who was 70 at the time, was found not guilty of second-degree animal cruelty for clubbing a peacock to death outside her Makaha Valley Towers home. Under the law at the time, second-degree animal-cruelty charges applied when intentionally killing any animal — other than insects, vermin and pests. Maloney’s attorney, Earle Partington, argued that peacocks were pests.

Partington said his client is living “happily in retirement.”

When cleared of the charge, Maloney said she planned to sue the condominium association for not taking care of its peafowl problem. But Partington said she has since changed her mind.

“She probably thought in the end it just wasn’t worth it,” he said.

The incident prompted lawmakers to make clarifications to animal-cruelty laws.

Senate Bill 1533 — informally referred to as the “peacock bill” —was introduced by Sen. Maile Shimabukuro (D, Nanakuli-Makaha) and enacted in July 2011. It clarifies that second-degree cruelty to animals applies if an animal is killed “without need.” It also specifies that insects, vermin or pests must be handled in accordance with standard and acceptable pest-control practices.

Under the new law, Maloney could have been found guilty because she did not use an approved method to get rid of the bird.

Inga Gibson, Hawaii state director of the Humane Society of the United States, said it is standard and acceptable to use a pest-­control professional, or to check with the state for approval of permits and methods for getting rid of pests — such as live trapping and humane euthanasia.

“Our main concern is that people don’t take matters in their own hands,” she said.

Shimabukuro said problems with peacocks should be handled like problems with cats and dogs. Partington, however, still doesn’t agree.

“Peafowl are pests and vermin,” he said. “A sharp blow to the head is (an approved method) by the American Veterinary Association.”

Gibson said she hasn’t been receiving complaints about peacocks in Makaha, even though they’re still there.

“They reproduce like crazy,” Partington said. “At some point, the state has to do something to exterminate them. They’re not endangered animals. They’re pretty, but we have to look at peafowl as feathered rats.”

The law says “extermination of any insects, vermin or pest must be conducted in accordance with standard and acceptable pest control practices,” but killing insects like cockroaches by force — such as with a slipper — is still acceptable, Shimabukuro said.

“You just wouldn’t hit a peacock that way.”

———
This update was written by Joie Nishimoto.

Star-Advertiser: ‘OHA Condo Plan Clears Hurdles in Senate’

Two committees pass a bill allowing towers to be built on certain Kakaako parcels

By Andrew Gomes
Star-Advertiser 2/13/14

The state Office of Hawaiian Affairs won support from two Senate committees Wednesday for developing condominium towers on land in Kakaako makai of Ala Moana Boulevard despite deeply divided testimony on a bill that would reverse a 2006 law prohibiting residential use in the area.

The bill that passed, however, was amended to restrict housing to three inland parcels out of nine mostly waterfront lots that the state gave to OHA two years ago to settle disputed claims over unpaid ceded-land revenue.

OHA had said it was seeking to develop housing on only three or four parcels, though the original bill allowed for residential use on all nine lots covering 31 acres.

Committees on Hawaiian Affairs and Economic Development, Government Operations and Housing voted unanimously to pass the amended version of the bill, Senate Bill 3122.

Hawaiian Affairs committee Chairwoman Maile Shimabukuro (D, Kalaeloa-Waianae-Makaha) acknowledged the heavy split of support and opposition over allowing condo development in the area, and proposed several amendments seeking to strike a balance.

One of the amendments would impose fees on residential units to be spent on helping maintain the area’s parks, ocean access, security and free public parking for park users.

Another amendment increases the development height limit on two parcels fronting Ala Moana Boulevard for residential development to 400 feet from 200 feet.

OHA sought the bill because it concluded that income from commercial development allowed under current zoning would fall short of what would typically be expected from land worth about $200 million, which was the ceded-land settlement value.

Appraisers for the state and OHA calculated that the land was worth $193 million to $198 million, which is what OHA could expect to receive if it sold the property.

However, a study commissioned by OHA last year assessed the earning potential for the land and concluded that achieving a market-rate annual income of $14 million to $16 million from $200 million of real estate isn’t possible with retail and other commercial development that would suffer from a lack of residents in the immediate area.

OHA testified that it will balance commerce and culture to create a redeveloped Kakaako Makai that will make Native Hawaiians and the general public proud.

“We seek to find the highest point at which the culturally rich use of our Kakaako Makai lands intersects with revenue-generating use of the parcels,” the agency said in written testimony. “We understand better than any other developer the impacts of irresponsible development. Native Hawaiians have been victims of, and suffered most from, the consequences of reckless development.”

Many OHA beneficiaries testified in support of the agency’s request, and urged lawmakers to pass the bill.

Click here to read the full story on the Star-Advertiser site.

Kamehameha Schools’ Kāpili ʻOihana Internship Program: Application Deadline 2/28/14

Click for the original flyer.

Click image for original flyer.

grnbox Program information.
grnbox Application.
grnbox Download an application or view a complete list of participating internship site at www.ksbe.edu/cphc