OHA: Kamakako`i Website

kamakakoi_logo

In early spring 2013, the Office of Hawaiian Affairs launched a website designed to bring new attention and a strong voice to critically important issues.

More than a year in the making, kamakakoi.com was introduced by OHA’s top leadership as a bold, new platform designed for key audiences to get informed, take action and spread the word on policy issues that are front and center in the Native Hawaiian community.

The new website features videos and articles that give a voice to community leaders, who are outspoken about such issues as water rights, the loss of ancient burial sites to development, and health risks on Pōhakuloa from exposure to depleted uranium.

Dr. Kamana'opono M. Crabbe, Chief Executive Officer at the Office of Hawaiian Affairs

Dr. Kamana’opono M. Crabbe, Chief Executive Officer at the Office of Hawaiian Affairs

“With Kamakako‘i, we are ramping up efforts to activate our community and help shape a brighter future for Hawai’i,” said Kamana’opono Crabbe, chief executive officer at OHA. “With Kamakako’i, we are breaking new ground in our ability to inspire action on policy matters important to the Native Hawaiian community. We will be able to rally people like we never have before.”

The site gives users the ability to mobilize others by, for example, sending e-mail alerts, submitting testimony on legislation, and signing petitions. Users are also able to share content through social-media sites such as Facebook and Twitter.

Hinaleimoana Wong-Kalu

Hinaleimoana Wong-Kalu, chairperson of the O’ahu Island Burial Council

Hinaleimoana Wong-Kalu, chairperson of the O’ahu Island Burial Council, was among the 100-plus community leaders who attended the launch of kamakakoi.com at the Cupola Theatre in the Honolulu Design Center.

“I feel that this is a positive step toward OHA enabling greater access to the hot-topic issues impacting the community today,” she said. “Kamakako‘i won’t be the only access point, but it will be a great access point for the community to learn more about issues so we are able to affect positive change.”

Moses Haia III, executive director of the Native Hawaiian Legal Corporation

Moses Haia III, executive director of the Native Hawaiian Legal Corporation

Moses Haia III, executive director of the Native Hawaiian Legal Corporation, summed up his reaction to Kamakako‘i this way: “It makes me feel reassured that we as a people are bringing the pride and dignity we had as a people into the 21st Century. Our ancestors would be proud.”

http://www.kamakakoi.com

Flossie Report: NWS Latest Update 7/29/13 @ Noon

Click image for the full report in PDF.

Click image for the full report in PDF.

Oahu emergency shelters set to open this afternoon (7/29/13, 11:05AM)

Oahu emergency shelters set to open this afternoon
By Star-Advertiser staff
POSTED: 11:03 a.m. HST, Jul 29, 2013
LAST UPDATED: 11:05 a.m. HST, Jul 29, 2013

Mayor Kirk Caldwell said this morning that 10 emergency shelters on Oahu will be open beginning at 3 p.m.

Waianae District Park at 85-601 Farrington Hwy.

Wahiawa District Park at 1139-A Kilani Ave.

Ewa Mahiko District Park at 91-1161 Renton Road

Kailua District Park at 21 South Kainalu Dr.

Kilauea District Park at 4109 Kilauea Ave.

Koko Head District Park at 423 Kaumakani St.

Waimanalo District Park 41-415 Hihimanu St.

Waialua Church of Christ at 67-174 Farrington Hw.y

BYU Hawaii at 55-220 Kulanui St.

Kalakaua District Park at 720 McNeill St.

Maui, Oahu now in Flossie’s path (7/29/13, 7:08AM)

Star-Advertiser: Maui, Oahu now in Flossie’s path; warning extends to Kauai
By Gordon Y.K. Pang & Craig Gima
POSTED: 10:46 a.m. HST, Jul 28, 2013
LAST UPDATED: 07:08 a.m. HST, Jul 29, 2013

HILO » Flossie, weakening but still a tropical storm, was starting its trek across the Hawaiian islands early this morning, with its latest predicted track taking a more northerly course that could mean more rain and wind for Maui County and Oahu.

At 5 a.m., the storm was packing diminished maximum sustained winds of 45 mph and was 120 east-northeast of Hilo and 290 miles east of Honolulu, moving west-northwest at 16 mph.

Tropical storm force winds extended 105 miles from the center. Late Sunday night, the storm had 60 mph winds and tropical storm force winds extended more than 160 miles from the center.

The revised track this morning takes Flossie directly over Maui this afternoon and Oahu later tonight; by Tuesday, the forecast calls for a weaker tropical depression over Kauai.

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