UH Community Colleges Oʻahu Virtual Job Fair 2020 May 18-21

The first ever Oʻahu University of Hawaiʻi Community Colleges Virtual Job Fair is scheduled for Monday May 18 through Thursday, May 21. It is open to all students, faculty and staff from Honolulu Community College, Kapiʻolani Community College, Leeward Community College and Windward Community College.

Visit the Oʻahu UH Community Colleges Virtual Job Fair website for:

  • A list of employers in attendance
  • Access to exclusive webinars and resources, such as resume reviews, to help prepare for the fair
  • Registration using your hawaii.edu email by Monday, May 18

This event is an opportunity to learn more about career paths from hiring professionals, build relationships with employers and find part-time and full-time jobs in a variety of industries that are hiring now. Featured industries include: Environmental conservation and management, healthcare, finance, public service, technology and transportation.

In preparation for the fair, technical support is being offered on Friday, May 15, on a drop-in basis 1–5 p.m. This is an opportunity to get answers to any questions about using Zoom or about the virtual booth experience. Zoom information for the virtual job fair will be provided upon registration. Other questions and answers may be on the FAQs or contact uhccjco@hawaii.edu.

Native Hawaiians Eligible for Rental Assistance During COVID-19 Crisis

Eleni Gill, “Native Hawaiians Eligible For Rental Assistance During COVID-19 Crisis,” CB, 5/11/20.

Applicants must be on the Department of Hawaiian Homelands waitlist for housing lots.

Native Hawaiians who have lost their jobs and income due to COVID-19 may qualify for as much as six months of rental assistance under a new state program.

The Department of Hawaiian Home Lands program will be administered by Aloha United Way.

Applicants must be Native Hawaiian and on DHHL’s waitlist for housing. To qualify, families must have a household income that doesn’t exceed 80% of the federal median income. If approved, they’ll receive funds for a security deposit and rent for up to six months.

DHHL is preparing to offer 1,300 lots over the next five years to eligible families, according to William Aila, Jr., the chairman of the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands.

“We hope the relief program will keep families in a position where they’ll be ready to take those 1,300 lots when they become available,” he said at a press conference Monday.

The agency has also offered financial assistance for mortgage payments during the pandemic.

Norm Baker, interim Aloha United Way President and CEO, estimated that 2,500 households will be saved from eviction.

“Of course if the family’s income is zero, as in many of the situations that we have today, the department through Aloha United Way will cover the entire security deposit as well as rent for up to six months,” Aila said.

Applications must include two months of the most recent pay stubs, bank statements, rental and lease documents, two years of tax documents, and proof that their unemployment was caused by COVID-19.

Those interested in applying should call Aloha United Way’s 2-1-1 hotline to see if they’re eligible.

The COVID-19 Emergency Rental Assistance Program includes a total of $7 million in Native Hawaiian Housing Block Grant (NHHBG) funds from the federal government.

The funds are approved under the Native Hawaiian Housing Assistance and Self-Determination Act (NAHASDA) and other federal laws, Aila said.

In Hawaii, about 13% of coronavirus cases involve Native Hawaiians or other Pacific Islander communities. Together, they represent 10% of the population when people of more than one race are excluded.

While Hawaii seems to have flattened the curve of the rate of COVID-19 infection, its unemployment rate has grown from 3% to more than 35% and is now considered the highest in the nation.

For the full story, go to the Civil Beat site.

 

 

 

Kupuna Quarantine Shed for DHHL Properties

Kauai: These Small Sheds May Soon Shelter Quarantined Family Members

Residents of Department of Hawaiian Home Lands properties are eligible for the new program, which aims to alleviate overcrowding in many homes.

Kupuna Quarantine Shed

By Allan Parachini, Civil Beat, 4/5/20

EXCERPTS (read the full article here):

– The project is the latest step to help Native Hawaiians counter the crisis by the Homestead Community Development Corp., with offices here and in Honolulu. The corporation will be offering below-market-rate financing for people who want to build the quarantine structures, which will cost between $2,000 and $7,500 depending on the design. Some may be basic boxes. Others may have windows and one design even has a sliding glass door.

– Payment plans will be offered that range from $90 per month spread over two years to $183 per month when spread over 48 months. Only residents of Department of Hawaiian Home Lands properties are eligible for the loan and construction program.

– [Robin Danner, CEO of the organization] said loan decisions will not be based on credit scores. “I want to say to our homestead families this is not the time to question what you assume your credit score to be. Let us worry about that. This is not the time to deny your elders a quarantine unit because you’re afraid you won’t qualify for a loan.”

– The structures are square, with pitched roofs. They are designed to house people in the short term but could be repurposed for storage once the COVID-19 danger has passed. The sheds are about 8-feet square and small enough that they fall below the minimum size for which a building permit is required.

– The projects are intended to be do-it-yourself affairs. Loan recipients will receive a list of tools and materials they will need, as well as a manual to walk them through the construction. Danner said the development corporation hopes to work with Honsador Lumber to obtain favorable pricing for materials, which mostly consist of plywood, 2-by-4s and roofing shingles.

– [Robin Danner, CEO of the organization] said loan customers will not be required to use Homestead Community Development Corp. plans or buy materials through the organization. She said an initial $200,000 in seed capital has already been raised and that development corporation staff members will be trained in processing loan applications, which could start moving through the process on Monday.

Sen. Shimabukuro Interviewed re Waianae Inter. Violence 2/24/20

School violence data shows areas of persistent trouble
by Gina Mangieri
KHON2, Feb 24, 2020

The stabbings at Mililani High School on Monday happened at a campus that has a relatively low rate of both violent and disciplinary incidents. Always Investigating and dug into the data for a statewide perspective.

The Mililani incident shows that safety issues can and do happen anywhere, while campuses with continually higher rates of violence continue to struggle.

Always Investigating worked for months to get school-by-school numbers from the Department of Education about both serious violence, as well as bullying and misconduct, for every public school campus.

According to the last complete school year’s data, there were nearly 4,000 “Class a” violence incidents statewide. These are things like assault, fighting, terroristic threatening and sexual offenses.

There were an average 15 Class A offenses reported per school for 2018-19, a range of none for many schools, and as high as 201 — the equivalent of more than 1 every school day. Mililani High School is below average for Class A’s with only 8 reported last school year.

There were more than 3,100 “Class B” incidents statewide for 2018-19, things like bullying, cyberbullying, disorderly conduct and hazing. There were an average of 12 per campus, and a range of none to 161. Mililani High School reported just two of those last school year.

Nonetheless, lawmakers still have questions for the DOE.

“We will be looking at this incident closely and talking with the principal, parents and Department of Education staff to see if there is anything that could have been done to prevent this attack or incidents like this in the future,” Rep. Justin Woodson, the chairman of the state House Education Committee, told KHON2..

Taking statewide Class A and B offense numbers together, the campuses with the highest counts in 2018-19 were mostly middle schools, and Waianae Intermediate School had the highest count: 293 in just one school year, followed by Waipahu Intermediate (247), Campbell High School (235), Kalama Intermediate (198), and Keaau Middle (181).

“We definitely need to do everything we can as a state to put more resources toward Waianae Intermediate School,” said Sen. Maile Shimabukuro, who represents the Waianae area in the state Senate.

Shimabukuro says she hopes things like the new higher teacher pay in this and other hard-to-staff regions, and more onsite resources such as truancy court, a mental and physical health clinic, even schoolwide air conditioning will make a difference in temperament.

“I hope we’re going to start to see this reverse,” Shimabukuro said, “and just know that the community really is trying to come together to address the problems that are happening at the school.”

Whether schools are at the high, middle or low range of the incident count though, one need remains constant for students across Hawaii: “Making sure they have easy access to mental health care as well as education about how to handle conflict peacefully, how to deal with difficult emotions,” Shimabukuro said.

We’ll continue to follow up with the Department of Education and lawmakers on what they’re doing to curb everything from serious violence to bullying statewide. And we’ll watch the numbers for signs of progress.

Copyright 2020 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Keani, Kelly and Kayla at HAIS District Science Fair 2/15/20

Kayla, Keani, & Kelly participated in the HAIS District Science Fair competition on 02/15/20.

Keani is an Island Pacific Academy 6th grader. Although he did not advance to the state competition, Keani had this to say: “Sadly I didn’t make it to states, but I now have an idea of what it will be like if I ever choose to go there again!”

Kelly, an Iolani junior, is going to advance to the state competition.

Kayla, an Iolani junior, is on the waitlist for the state competition.

Most of the Island Pacific Academy students who participated in the district competition.

Senator Shimabukuro Amends SB42 (CB 2/11/20)

Lawmakers Limit Scope of Bill Banning AG’s Probe of Hawaiian Nonprofit
By Blaze Lovell, Civil Beat, 11 Feb. 2020

A key Senate panel unanimously voted Tuesday to narrow the extent to which the state Attorney General’s Office can investigate certain nonprofits.

The Hawaiian Affairs Committee amended Senate Bill 42 to prohibit AG investigations from conflicting with Native Hawaiian cultural rights protected under the state constitution.

The proposal in front of lawmakers is a reaction to the AG’s probe of KAHEA: The Hawaiian Environmental Alliance. The state subpoenaed financial documents related to the nonprofit’s support of protests that have halted the construction of the Thirty Meter Telescope on Mauna Kea.

The bill originally would have prohibited the AG from investigating any nonprofit that engages in acts of civil disobedience, which state lawyers raised objections to because it could essentially tie the state’s hands in investigating any nonprofit.

“Our intent is not to hinder the AG from doing its job,” said Sen. Maile Shimabukuro, chair of the Hawaiian Affairs Committee.

Shimabukuro introduced the measure by putting its contents into a blank bill last week. She amended the bill to include the narrower language involving conflicts, which was put forward by University of Hawaii law professor Ken Lawson.

In KAHEA’s case, the state is conflicted, Lawson said, because it has an interest in seeing TMT built on Mauna Kea, a mountain considered sacred by many Native Hawaiians.  Continue reading

Bill to Eliminate Reconstructed Vehicle Inspection

Bill would eliminate special inspections for lowriders, lifted vehicles
By Lisa Kubota, HNN, February 12, 2020

HONOLULU, Hawaii (HawaiiNewsNow) – Many car enthusiasts hope that a proposal to get rid of a special inspection for reconstructed vehicles gets the green light from state lawmakers.

They’re tracking Senate Bill 213, which was passed by the Senate Transportation Committee last week.  Continue reading